On This Day

TODAY IS MAY 19, 2020!

MAY 19, 2020

Today is:

Boys and Girls Club Day

Dinosaur Day

National Devils Food Cake Day

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

HO CHI MINH (1890-1969) — Vietnamese politician and revolutionary.  First president of socialist Vietnam.
MALCOLM X (1925-1965) — American Muslim minister & civil  and human rights activist.
PETER MAYHEW  (1944-2019) — English-American actor.  Most famous for portraying Chewbacca in the Star Wars films and media from 1977-2015.
ANDRE THE GIANT (1946-1993) — French professional wrestler and actor. (The Princess Bride)
JODI PICOULT (1966) — American novelist (My Sister’s Keeper, Nineteen Minutes)
SAM SMITH  (1992) — English singer-songwriter.

 

TODAY IN HISTORY

1743 – French physicist Jean-Pierre Christin first publishes his centigrade temperature scale, with 0 as the freezing point of water and 100 its boiling point (the reverse of that developed by Andres Celsius).
1921 – The US Congress passes the Emergency Quota Act, placing for the first time limits on the number of immigrants allowed to enter the United States.
1963 – The New York Post Sunday Magazine publishes Martin Luther King, Jr’s “A Letter from a Birmingham Jail“, written on April 16, 1963.
On This Day

TODAY IS MAY 18, 2020!

MAY 18, 2020

Today is:

I Love Reese’s Day

International Museum Day

National No Dirty Dishes Day

 National Cheese Souffle Day

 Send an Electronic Greeting Card Day

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

MATTHEW BRADY (c1822-1896) — American photography pioneer.  Most famous for his presidential portraits and  Civil War photography.
NICHOLAS II of RUSSIA (1868-1918) — Last Tsar of the Russian Empire.  Forced to abdicate during the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917.
FRANK CAPRA  (1897-1991) — Italian-American film director, winner of three Academy Awards. Best known for It Happened One Night, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, It’s a Wonderful Life.
POPE ST. JOHN PAUL II  (1920-2005) — Head of the Catholic Church from 1978-2005, the second longest reign in history.  Canonized as a saint in 2014.
GEORGE STRAIT (1952) — American country singer-songwriter, actor, and producer.  Dubbed the “King of Country”
TINA FEY  (1970) — American actress, comedian, author & producer (Saturday Night Live, 30 Rock, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt)

 

TODAY IN HISTORY

1652 – Rhode Island passes the first law in English-speaking North America declaring slavery illegal.
1804 Napoleon Bonaparte is declared the Emperor of France by the French Senate, becoming Napoleon I.
1860 – Abraham Lincoln becomes the Republican Party’s nominee for President, over William Seward who will later become his Secretary of State.
1896 – The US Supreme Court rules in the Plessy v. Ferguson case that the doctrine of “separate but equal” is constitutional.
1980 Mount Saint Helens erupts in Washington State, killing 57 people and causing over $3 billion in damage.
Photo Prompt

Daily Photo (5/12/20) – Einstein Teaching (colorized)

Photo — “EInstein Teaching”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

Ninety years ago laboratory equipment and safety standards were a little more relaxed than today!

1946. “Albert Einstein teaching at Lincoln [University]” Original photo in B&W, this has been colorized.

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

On This Day

TODAY IS APRIL 16, 2020!

APRIL 16, 2020

Today is:


Day of the Mushroom — A day to recognize those edible fungi that are great eaten plain, stuffed, or on your pizza.

National High Five Day — Raise those hands and smack em together!

National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day — Let’s be honest here, who isn’t nowadays if we’re all working from home?

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

WILBUR WRIGHT (1867-1912) — American inventor.  With brother Orville, half of the famed Wright Brothers.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN (1889-1977) — English actor, director, screenwriter, & producer.  Most famous for playing “The Little Tramp” in silent comedy shorts.
KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR  (1947) — American Hall of Fame basketball player and actor.
BILL BELICHICK (1952) — American football head coach (New England Patriots).  Winner of six Super Bowls and third on the all time wins list.
MARTIN LAWRENCE (1965) — American actor, comedian, & television show host (Bad Boys, Martin, House Party).

 

TODAY IN HISTORY

1547 BC – The Battle of Megiddo, the first battle in history recorded in what is considered reliable detail.
1910 – The oldest, still active, multi-purpose sports arena in the world, The Boston (now Matthews) Arena is opened.
1963 – Martin Luther King, Jr. writes his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” while incarcerated for protesting against segregation.
February 2020, Nonfiction

Accused! by Larry Dane Brimner

Accused!: The Trials of the Scottsboro Boys: Lies, Prejudice, and the Fourteenth Amendment by Larry Dane Brimner. October 15, 2019. Calkins Creek, 189 p. ISBN: 9781629797755.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA.

This chilling and harrowing account tells the story of the Scottsboro Boys, nine African-American teenagers who, when riding the rails during the Great Depression, found their lives destroyed after two white women falsely accused them of rape. Award-winning author Larry Dane Brimner explains how it took more than eighty years for their wrongful convictions to be overturned.

In 1931, nine teenagers were arrested as they traveled on a train through Scottsboro, Alabama. The youngest was thirteen, and all had been hoping to find something better at the end of their journey. But they never arrived. Instead, two white women falsely accused them of rape. The effects were catastrophic for the young men, who came to be known as the Scottsboro Boys. Being accused of raping a white woman in the Jim Crow south almost certainly meant death, either by a lynch mob or the electric chair. The Scottsboro boys found themselves facing one prejudiced trial after another, in one of the worst miscarriages of justice in U.S. history. They also faced a racist legal system, all-white juries, and the death penalty. Noted Sibert Medalist Larry Dane Brimner uncovers how the Scottsboro Boys spent years in Alabama’s prison system, enduring inhumane conditions and torture. The extensive back matter includes an author’s note, bibliography, index, and further resources and source notes.

Potentially Sensitive Areas: Discrimination, Mild language, Racism

 

Reviews

Booklist starred (September 1, 2019 (Vol. 116, No. 1))
Grades 9-12. Brimner, who won the 2018 Sibert Award for his book Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961, now looks at the case of the Scottsboro boys, nine black teenagers who were arrested and falsely accused of raping two white women in 1931. The teenagers were riding the rails, hoping to find work in Alabama. Instead, they got into a fight with some white boys and were arrested when the train was stopped. But the fight wasn’t the only trouble they found—two white women who had been aboard the train accused them of rape. Brimner has his work cut out for himself in telling this complicated story. There are numerous accounts from defendants, witnesses, and lawyers; the perspective switches between the accused young men, who at times turn on each other; and the story contains important political and social elements, including an exploration of racism and the willingness of a Communist organization to defend the nine to promote its ideology. Not all the plates are kept in the air, but Brimner gives the narrative both heft and heart. The book’s design uses black-and-white photos to good advantage. A solid look at a noteworthy event that touched upon many aspects of U.S. society.

Kirkus Reviews starred (August 15, 2019)
Brimner (Blacklisted!, 2018, etc.) revisits the history of injustice in America. Brimner has extensively researched the heartbreaking story of the suffering and stolen futures of nine African American teens falsely accused of the rape of two white women in Alabama in 1931, laying all the facts on the table in a concise, gripping volume. The engaging, easy-to-follow text will draw readers into a historical account that mirrors many of today’s headlines. Ultimately, it took over 80 years for justice to finally be served for these young men; they were not fully exonerated until 2013. In the meantime, they were nearly lynched, attacked and beaten by guards, and faced execution. Even after they were released from prison, their lives were ruined, and they were never able to fully recover. The text is enhanced with primary sources including photos, newspaper clippings, ephemera, and court documents that give readers a sense of immediacy. The author’s note provides context about the enduring impact of the trials. This volume stands as a reminder to readers that lies have consequences and that no matter how long it takes, “We need to right the wrongs that have been done in the past.” The parallels between the perils the Scottsboro Boys endured and current news stories show the continued relevance of this history, making this a must-have for both school and public libraries. Engaging and historically accurate; highly recommended. (author’s note, bibliography, source notes, index, picture credits) (Nonfiction. 13-adult)

About the Author

Larry Dane Brimner is the recipient of the 2018 Robert F. Sibert Award for the most distinguished informational book for children for his title Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961. He is known for his well-researched, innovative, and award-winning nonfiction for young readers, and is the author of multiple acclaimed civil rights titles, including Strike!: The Farm Workers’ Fight for Their Rights; and Black & White: The Confrontation between Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene “Bull” Connor.

His website is www.brimner.com.

Teacher Resources

Scottsboro Boys Lesson Plan

Around the Web

Accused! on Amazon

Accused! on Barnes and Noble

Accused! on Goodreads

Accused! on LibraryThing

Accused! Publisher Page

Photo Prompt

Photo Prompt – Klan v. Police, 1992

Photo — “Klan v. Police, 1992”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

Given the current state of affairs regarding Civil Rights, the police, and racial tensions in general this is a very interesting and rich photograph for discussion and analysis. Take in the photo as a whole, with context, and then even the details such as the reflection itself and the expression on the officer’s face.

1992. A young boy in KKK robes sees his reflection in a riot shield held by an African-American state trooper. Taken in Gainesville, Ga. by Todd Robertson. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)

Artwork

Daily Art – Let My People Free, William H. Johnson

Daily Artwork — “Let My People Free, William H. Johnson, c.1945”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

c.1945 — Let My People Free.  Oil paint on paperboard. Primitivism style. William H. Johnson (1901-1970). Smithsonian American Art Museum (gift of the Harmon Foundation), Washington, DC, USA.

Click image to enlarge