Photo Prompt

Daily Photo (5/20/20) – Take It All!, 1940

Photo — “Take It All!, 1940”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.!

May 1940. “Nurse giving instructions to son of migratory laborer as to how to take medicine. Agua Fria migratory labor camp, Arizona.” Acetate negative by Russell Lee. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

On This Day

TODAY IS MAY 14, 2020!

MAY 14, 2020

Today is:

Dance Like a Chicken Day

National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

GEORGE LUCAS (1944) — American filmmaker & entrepreneur.  Creator of Star Wars and co-creator of Indiana Jones.  Founder of LucasFilm.
EOIN COLFER (1965) — Irish author, best known for the Artemis Fowl series.
MARK ZUCKERBERG  (1984) — American computer programmer and entrepreneur.  Co-founder of Facebook.

 

TODAY IN HISTORY

1607Jamestown, Virginia is settled as an English colony, becoming the first permanent English settlement in North America.
1796 – English physician Edward Jenner administers the first smallpox inoculation. The disease will be officially deemed eradicated in 1980.
1804 – Wiliam Clark and the Corps of Discovery depart Camp Dubois, Illinois to meet Meriwether Lewis in St. Charles, Missouri, marking the beginning of the Lewis & Clark Expedition.
1948 – Israel is declared an independent state and a provisional government is established.  It is immediately attacked by neighboring countries, igniting the Arab-Israeli War.
1973 – The United States’ first space station, Skylab, is launched.
Photo Prompt

Daily Photo – Contagious, 1918

Photo — “Contagious, 1918”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

1918. “”Demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington, D.C., during the influenza pandemic.” 4×5 glass negative. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

Infographic

Infographic – The Healing Power of the Purr

The Healing POwer of Cats’ Purrs

Many medical professionals are touting the great benefits of pet therapy.  There is scientific evidence that pet owners live longer than those without furry friends, and there is even science behind why we feel better around animals.  Today’s infographic takes a look at that, showing the science behind the calming effect of your cat’s purr. [VIA]

Click image to enlarge
Purr
February 2020, Graphic Novel, Nonfiction

Fever Year by Don Brown

Fever Year: The Killer Flu of 1918 by Don Brown. September 3, 2019. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 96 p. ISBN: 9780544837409.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA; Lexile: 1020.

New Year’s Day, 1918. America has declared war on Germany and is gathering troops to fight. But there’s something coming that is deadlier than any war.

When people begin to fall ill, most Americans don’t suspect influenza. The flu is known to be dangerous to the very old, young, or frail. But the Spanish flu is exceptionally violent. Soon, thousands of people succumb. Then tens of thousands . . . hundreds of thousands and more. Graves can’t be dug quickly enough.

What made the influenza of 1918 so exceptionally deadly—and what can modern science help us understand about this tragic episode in history? With a journalist’s discerning eye for facts and an artist’s instinct for true emotion, Sibert Honor recipient Don Brown sets out to answer these questions and more in Fever Year.

Potentially Sensitive Areas: Harsh realities of war

 

Reviews

Booklist (July 2019 (Vol. 115, No. 21))
Grades 7-10. As WWI neared its end, the world began another war. From army camps to the world’s great cities, Brown presents the terrifying influenza pandemic of 1918 as a three-act tragedy. Brown follows the disease’s lightning-fast spread carefully, capturing both its large scale and daily effects on a full one third of humanity. Pertinent historic details and quotes heighten the drama, from the denial by authorities—“don’t even discuss it . . . talk of cheerful things,” advised the Philadelphia Inquirer—to the blind search for a cure based on a faulty nineteenth-century theory. Brown is comics’ premiere chronicler of historical catastrophes, and he knows that the story requires emotional investment. This he finds by, for instance, highlighting the common bravery of nurses and volunteers, and making keen visual choices: a double-page splash showing “the life of the city stopped,” and intimate panels depicting family corpses laid to rest “in a corner of the household.” A somewhat abrupt ending relating a scientist’s efforts in 1995 doesn’t detract from the urgency of the tale.

Horn Book Magazine (November/December, 2019)
Brown (most recently The Unwanted, rev. 9/18) here turns his attention to the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, which brought “sickness to a third of the planet and death to millions of people.” The book, in comics format, is billed as “a tragedy in three acts.” Act I covers the first half of 1918 and describes the disease’s probable origin in the United States; Act II, the longest section, covers the second half of 1918 and details the inexorable spread of the infection throughout the world; Act III covers 1919 as the epidemic finally begins to fade away-leaving in its wake “incalculable” misery and sorrow. In his illustrations, Brown has a knack for dramatizing details with striking visual angles that produce maximum emotional impact while still conveying solid, accurate information. His text succinctly traces the evolution of the medical disaster with statistics and anecdotes woven in, while his somber, muted palette expertly captures the mood of the period (“America was at war…People had decided to ration happiness along with beef and chicken”). Source notes and a bibliography are appended.

About the Author

Don Brown is the award-winning author and illustrator of many picture book biographies. He has been widely praised for his resonant storytelling and his delicate watercolor paintings that evoke the excitement, humor, pain, and joy of lives lived with passion. School Library Journal has called him “a current pacesetter who has put the finishing touches on the standards for storyographies.” He lives in New York with his family.

His website is www.booksbybrown.com.

Teacher Resources

Great Flu Epidemic Lesson Plans

Around the Web

Fever Year on Amazon

Fever Year on Barnes and Noble

Fever Year on Goodreads

Fever Year on LibraryThing

Fever Year Publisher Page

January 2020, Nonfiction

Body 2.0 by Sara Latta

Body 2.0 by Sara Latta. November 5, 2019. Twenty-First Century Books, 96 p. ISBN: 9781541528130.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA; Lexile: 1170.

Scientists are on the verge of a revolution in biomedical engineering that will forever change the way we think about medicine, even life itself. Cutting-edge researchers are working to build body organs and tissue in the lab. They are developing ways to encourage the body to regenerate damaged or diseased bone and muscle tissue. Scientists are striving to re-route visual stimuli to the brain to help blind people see. They may soon discover methods to enlist the trillions of microbes living in our bodies to help us fight disease. Learn about four strands of bioengineering―tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, neuroengineering, microbial science, and genetic engineering and synthetic biology―and meet scientists working in these fields.

Potentially Sensitive Areas: None

 

Reviews

Booklist (December 1, 2019 (Vol. 116, No. 7))
Grades 8-12. Young scientists need look no further for a solid introduction to engineering in biology and medicine. Latta educates readers on the use of stem cells in the regeneration of limbs, the creation and repair of organs, brain-computer interfaces that help with restoring movement, gene therapy and its role in treating illnesses, as well as research on neurons and the part played by bacteria in improving health and immunity. Material is made engaging through interesting anecdotes that introduce each chapter. Large color photographs and diagrams accompany the text, and each chapter contains additional factual asides and related text within boxed sidebars. Spotlights on notable biomedical and chemical engineers highlight these important role players as well as the steps necessary to pursue such a career. The inclusion of statements from researchers and scientists working on real-life cases adds further insight, with each case highlighting the incredible possibilities of the field. This foundational text is must-have for juvenile nonfiction collections.

Kirkus Reviews starred (September 15, 2019)
A primer on biomedical engineering. Veteran science author Latta (Zoom in on Mining Robots, 2018, etc.) here spotlights the fascinating convergence of medicine, engineering, and scientific discovery, offering provocative glimpses into the burgeoning fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, neuroscience, microbiology, genetic engineering, and synthetic biology. Inspiring problem-solving–minded teens to explore these STEM disciplines by describing projects so cutting edge they seem like science fiction, Latta also includes brief profiles and photos of diverse researchers that enable readers to imagine themselves pursuing similar careers. Says Dr. Gilda Barabino, “I think there’s a little bit of an engineer in everybody. It’s curiosity! Everybody wants to know how things work.” Areas of potential breakthrough covered include brain-computer interfaces that may one day allow people with paralysis or limited mobility to move their limbs or control a robot helper; editing the human genome to treat chronic diseases like sickle cell disease by removing and replacing damaged DNA; optogenetics, which hopes to combine gene therapy with light to reduce pain and cure blindness; and growing bespoke body parts like bone, skin, arteries, and more in the lab, seeded by one’s own cells and partially crafted by 3-D bioprinters. Full-color diagrams and photos combined with informative text boxes and a lively, conversational style make this an appealing choice. Hot and heady: an enticing calling card for researchers of tomorrow. (glossary, source notes, bibliography, further information, index, photo credits) (Nonfiction. 13-18)

About the Author

Sara Latta is the author of seventeen books for children and young adults on topics that include dark matter, the secret life of microbes, DNA, bones, and forensic science. She also has a masters degree in immunology. She does have a bit of a phobia about heights, as she discovered when faced with having to climb down from a pyramid in Teotihuacan, Mexico.

Her website is www.saralatta.com

Teacher Resources

Collection of Biomedical Engineering Lesson Plans

Around the Web

Body 2.0 on Amazon

Body 2.0 on Barnes and Noble

Body 2.0 on Goodreads

Body 2.0 on LibraryThing

Body 2.0 Publisher Page