On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 29 – iPhone Released to the World

TODAY IN HISTORY…

The First iPhone is REleased in the US

On June 29, 2007, after months of waiting, the first iPhones are released for sale in the US.  The revolutionary phone from Apple included touchscreen controls similar to their iPod devices, with the capability of also being a strong telephone and Internet engine.  Running on a computer operating system similar to an Apple computer, these devices ushered in the era of the Smartphones, forever changing how people communicate.

Check out this video of Steve Jobs’ original announcement of the iPhone from January, 2007:

Infographic

Inventors of Everyday Technology – Infographic

The Inventors of Everyday Technology

They’re the things we use everyday and often take for granted, but at one time, none of these things existed.  From potato chips to airplanes; indoor plumbing to cars, these technologies at one time were created and then perfected by someone, but who?  Today’s infographic takes a look at the people and things behind the tech we use every day of our lives.  [VIA]

Click image to enlarge

On This Day

TODAY IS MAY 7, 2020!

MAY 7, 2020

Today is:

Make a Book Day

National Children’s Mental Health Day

National Day of Prayer

 National Day of Reason

  National Tourism Day

  World Password Day

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) — German composer, pianist, and conductor.
PYTOR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840-1893) — American actor and director (The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, On the Waterfront)
GARY COOPER  (1901-1961) — American actor from the Classical Hollywood era. (Sgt. York, Pride of the Yankees, High Noon)
EVA PERÓN (1919-1952) — Argentinian actress, First Lady of Argentina, & activist.  Called the “Spiritual Leader of the Nation”.
DARRIN McGAVIN (1922-2006) — American actor, most familiar today as “the Old Man” (Ralphie’s father) in A Christmas Story.

 

TODAY IN HISTORY

1915 – The RMS Lusitania is sunk by a German U-boat, killing 1,198 people, including 128 Americans.  This event turns American sentiment against the German Empire in WWI.
1945 – German General Alfred Jodl signs the unconditional surrender of German troops at Reims, France, ending German participation in World War II.
1952 – The concept for the integrated circuit, the basis for all modern computers, is first published.
Photo Prompt

Daily Photo – Pedal Skates, c1910

Photo — “Pedal Skates, c1910”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

From these to rollerblades in about 80 years.  Isn’t technology wonderful?

Circa 1910. “Charles E. Nordling with his pedal skates.”

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

Blog, Websites

Traffic Simulator

Traffic Simulator

Looking for a fun distraction that also includes a little civic and social engineering, Traffic Simulator gives you and your students a chance to see how slight changes in road systems, driving patterns, and other factors can lead to major back-ups on our roadways.

The initial pattern on the website is a steady circle of traffic (ring road), and you can manipulate different factors such as the total number of cars on the road, the number of those that are trucks, and the acceleration of those vehicles to show how each affects the traffic in a closed system.  Once you’ve played with that and messed up rush hour, you can try the other traffic patterns, such as adding an on-ramp (above), off-ramp, construction, hill, or detour to see how each can also change the traffic.  Different elements can again be manipulated to test the roads and demonstrate how different factors can lead to traffic nightmares.

Explanations of some of the physics and psychology of traffic are provided through the links on the sidebar, as well as different ways to use the simulation.  Traffic Simulator is a wonderful tool for seeing how traffic patterns can shift and change and what affects them, as well as providing students with some problem solving as they work through how to alleviate the traffic and find the ideal conditions for each roadway.

Fiction, November 2019

Rated by Melissa Grey

Rated by Melissa Grey. September 3, 2019. Scholastic Press, 320 p. ISBN: 9781338283570.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA.

The ratings are real. One number, 0 to 100, determines your place in society. Earn a high rating, and the world is yours for the taking. But fall to zero, and you may as well cease to exist.

Societies thrive on order, and the Rating System is the ultimate symbol of organized social mobility.

The higher it soars, the more valued you are. The lower it plummets, the harder you must work to improve yourself. For the students at the prestigious Maplethorpe Academy, every single thing they do is reflected in their ratings, updated daily and available for all to see.

But when an act of vandalism sullies the front doors of the school, it sets off a chain reaction that will shake the lives of six special students — and the world beyond.

Potentially Sensitive Areas: Mild sexual themes

 

Book Trailer

Reviews

Kirkus Reviews (July 1, 2019)
Six mismatched students fight against the societal rating system that rules every aspect of their lives. Grey (The Savage Dawn) provides a glimpse into the panoptic future of globalized and wearable technology where teachers, parents, and peers can influence someone’s future by docking points from personal ratings. Access to food, hospitals, and education are all regulated by a person’s rating. A motley crew of students at Maplethorpe Academy are urged into action when someone graffitis, “THE RATINGS ARE NOT REAL,” onto the front door of their school. Bex, the overachieving dark-skinned brain; Javi, the ambiguously Latin and bronze-skinned gay beauty; jocks Chase (coded white) and Hana (Japanese)—dealing with an alcoholic father and an unspecified eating disorder, respectively; Tamsin, the white tarot-reading, rating-defying rebel; and Noah, the photography enthusiast, bi-curious, white recluse are individually targeted as all six receive personal messages. Unsure of who is sending them, the sextet investigates, uniting to fight the tyranny of the school princess and destroy the oppressive rating system. Ever wondered what a dystopian John Hughes young adult novel would be like? Grey closely hits the mark in her departure from fantasy and incursion into science fiction: The novel unfortunately falls into predictability, and the dystopian world is riddled with teen character stereotypes. An unappealing plot peopled with two-dimensional characters. (Science fiction. 13-17)

Publishers Weekly (June 24, 2019)
At elite Maplethorpe Academy, six students receive riddles and clues suggesting that all is not right with their society’s universal rating system, which decides everything from education and healthcare to social standing. Each teen has a reason to challenge or distrust the system, but only by working together can they decipher the messages and discover the truth behind current events. After graffiti warns that “the ratings are not real,” academically struggling jock Chase becomes close to overachieving Bex; professional e-gamer Javi is drawn to photographer Noah; and driven figure skater Hana befriends goth outcast Tamsin, whose rating is plummeting due to a bullying campaign. The six separate narratives don’t intersect until near the end, at which point the teens join forces, leading up to an open-ended conclusion. Grey (the Girl at Midnight books) presents an intriguing premise, but the lack of detail behind the rating system creates uneven worldbuilding, and the story hits perhaps too many buttons, between Chase’s dyslexia and alcoholic father, Hana’s anorexia, Noah’s sister’s leukemia, Javi’s confusion over his attraction to Noah, and Bex’s domineering parents. Still, despite the somewhat cluttered narrative, this is a provocative dystopian offering. Ages 12-up

About the Author

Melissa Grey was born and raised in New York City. She wrote her first short story at the age of twelve and hasn’t stopped writing since. She is the author of The Girl at Midnight, The Shadow Hour, and The Savage Dawn. When she’s not penning novels, she’s writing video games for Voltage Entertainment, most recently Speakeasy Tonight and Starship Promise.

She can also ride a horse and shoot a bow and arrow at the same time, for what it’s worth, which is not much at all. Unless there’s some kind of zombie apocalypse. Then it’ll be worth a whole lot more.

Her website is www.melissa-grey.com.

Around the Web

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