Photo Prompt

Daily Photo (6/30/20) – Americanization, 1920

Photo — “Americanization, 1920”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

Washington, D.C., circa 1920. “Americanization class.” The main location for these citizenship classes was the old Central High School at Seventh and O streets. Thirty nations were represented, “Italy having the largest number,” according to a 1922 article in the Washington Post. “The Hebrews come second, with Greece third.” National Photo Company Collection glass negative. 

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 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 30 – Charles Guiteau Executed

TODAY IN HISTORY…

The Execution of Charles Guiteau, Presidential Assassin

On June 30, 1882, the assassin of President James Garfield, Charles Guiteau was executed for his crime in Washington DC.

A disgruntled office seeker, Guiteau had been stalking the President for months seeking an appointment as the US Consul to Paris.  Rebuked for the final time, he ambushed and shot Garfield in the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station in Washington DC on July 2, 1881.  Garfield died 11 weeks later after extensive treatment by a large team of doctors.  These even included Alexander Graham Bell who tried using and early version of his telephone technology to find the bullets that struck the President.  It is believed that had the doctors followed simple antiseptic practices, new to the time, that Garfield may have survived his wounds.

Check out this video on the assassination:

Photo Prompt

Daily Photo (6/26/20) – Berry Picking, 1909

Photo — “Berry Picking, 1909”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

July 1909. “Mrs. Bissie and family (Polish). Bottomley Farm, Rock Creek. They all work in the berry fields near Baltimore in summer and have worked at Biloxi, Mississippi, for two years.” Glass negative by Lewis Wickes Hine. 

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(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 26 – Berlin Airlift Begins

TODAY IN HISTORY…

Breaking the Berlin Blockade

On June 26, 1948 planes began flying over Soviet-controlled East Germany and dropping supplies into the city of West Berlin in what became known as the Berlin Airlift.

After the partition of Germany and its capital city after World War II, the allied controlled portion of Berlin was completely enveloped within Soviet controlled (and communist) East Germany.  The Soviets had blocked all access into the city by land and rail two days before in an effort to choke the Allied forces out, becoming one of the first conflicts in what would become the Cold War.  The blockade was lifted on May 12, 1949, but British and American planes continued to fly supplies into West Berlin until September 30 of that year.

Check out this video:

Photo Prompt

Daily Photo (6/23/20) – Bath Time in Vietnam

Photo — “Bath Time in Vietnam, 1966”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

January 16, 1966. Chu Lai, Vietnam.  US Marines carry their weapons with them everywhere in a combat zone, even when heading to the bath.

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(Source)

 Photo posted for educational and informational purposes only,.  Any and all copyrights are retained by the original holders.

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 17 – The Battle of Bunker Hill

TODAY IN HISTORY…

The Battle of Bunker HIll in Boston

On June 17, 1775, with the city of Boston under siege by the British Army, American colonists began establishing fortifications on hills surrounding the city to defend it, and the British did the same to attack it.  Two of these, Breed’s Hill and Bunker Hill were key objectives for both armies.

On this day, intense battles were fought on both hills, and while the American troops retreated from the field, making this a British victory, they inflicted heavy losses on the British army, including many officers — showing this would not be the easy war the British had hoped for.

Learn more here:

 

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 15 – Arlington National Cemetery Established

TODAY IN HISTORY…

Arlington National Cemetery Formally Established

On June 15, 1864, US Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton officially sets aside 200 acres of land on the captures Custis-Lee Estate to establish a military cemetery for fallen Union soldiers.  The land and the home was the former residence of Confederate General Robert E. Lee whose wife, Mary Anna Custis Lee (great-granddaughter of Martha Washington) inherited the house from her father who had it built in 1802.

Prior to its establishment as a cemetery, the grounds at Arlington, having been seized by Union forces early in the conflict (May 1861), had been used for the defense of Washington and as a Freedman’s village with homes for what eventually numbered over 3,000 slaves freed during the war.

Today the house and grounds are part of a larger 624 acre cemetery complex, with further expansions possible and is maintained by the US Department of the Army.

Arlington National Cemetery

History of Arlington National Cemetery

 

Tours of Famous Graves at Arlington National Cemetery

 

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 11 – Jeanette Rankin Born

TODAY IN HISTORY…

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, JEANETTE RANKIN

On June 11, 1880, Jeanette Rankin was born in what was then the Montana Territory.  At a young age, as the oldest of six children working side by side with her parents on the family ranch, she often noted that while women shared an equal amount of work, both in time and the intensity of the labor, with men, in politics they had no voice and she sought to change that.

She was elected twice to serve Montana as a US Representative as a Republican, first in 1916 (four years before women gained the right to vote nationwide) and again in 1940.  Her 1916 election marked the first time a woman was elected to a federal office, and while serving she proposed the articles that would eventually become the 19th Amendment, giving women the univeral right to vote in the US.

Also notable is that both of her terms happened to fall at the beginnings of both World War I and World War II.  She was one of 50 members of Congress to vote against the declaration of war in 1917, and the lone no vote against declaring war in World War II.

Learn more about Representative Rankin here:

On This Day, Video

Daily Video for June 10 – Bridget Bishop Hanged

TODAY IN HISTORY…

THE SALEM WITCH TRIALS FIRST EXECUTION

On June 10, 1692, Bridget Bishop of Salem was hanged for “certaine Detestable Arts called Witchcraft and Sorceries”.  She will be the first of 20 people (14 women, 5 men, and a young girl) executed during the Salem Witch Hysteria that lasted from 1692-1693.

While the true nature of the symptoms and causes of those claiming to be bewitched has been studied and up for debate for many years, this remains one of the hallmark examples of mass hysteria in Colonial America and the world and as such has become the subject of many media interpretations and intense speculation for over 300 years.

Learn more about the Salem Witch Trials: